Tag: therapy practice finances

New Video: Do You Remember…?

Dirty Nappies and Sticky Toffees

When I was growing up, a cousin, about four or five years younger than me, asked his mother (in the hearing of several of us older kids) to chew his toffee for him because it was too hard.

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He never lived it down.

At the time, I dismissed him as immature and childish. In recent times, I have begun to relate more to where he was at! I have begun to recognise that there’s a part of all of us that doesn’t want to do the dirty work, put out the bins, or have the difficult conversations. Read more

John’s Story

I have written on many occasions on the link between our beliefs and values about money and wealth and the direct impact they have on our ability to create a financially viable therapy practice.

Recently, I have been working with a client who has been exploring his struggle to earn a decent living in his small metalworking business, and to create financial security in his life.  His name is John, and I have his permission to tell some of his story here to illustrate in concrete terms how beliefs that we have carried since childhood shape our way of being with money. These beliefs are often swallowed whole without subjecting them to any scrutiny. Read more

Clients Come Through People

Where does the income in your practice come from? Well, obviously from the fees you receive from clients or organisations who pay on the clients’ behalf. But that’s only part of the story.

We none of us exist in isolation. There is a constant process from birth to death of interacting with our environment. Basic physical functions that meet our bodies’ needs such as breathing, eating, and sleeping all involve interacting with our environment.

In the same way we receive and pay out money in a constantly moving cycle. We may dislike money, but that is the medium that our society has chosen to make the exchange of goods and services easier. Money is a convenient way for us to give what we have in order to receive what we want. We are paid for giving our services, and we use that money to buy goods and services from others. Read more

Poverty Consciousness

I was in my twenties when I first heard the expression “Poverty Consciousness” and I immediately related to it in myself. I understood it then as expressing a presumption that there is a finite amount of resources to go around and so everything I get takes from someone else. It expresses a bias in perception towards “what there is not” or “what is lacking” and away from “what there is.”

Poverty consciousness leads us to hold tight to what we have, in fear that there will be no more. It can lead people to stay in jobs or relationships that no longer serve them, or to collect things that have no meaning or value for them because they fear that nothing will fill the space left by the absence of those things. And it leads to a focus on external reasons for staying stuck, such as, “There’s no point marketing my practice because there aren’t any clients who have money to pay for therapy.”

And for many people, this perspective of the world is their reality. Read more

Working with Others

Do you work with others in your practice? Perhaps it’s not as formal as a partnership, but arrangements with other practitioners are common in flying teamtherapy. Often people come together to share costs and otherwise have little interaction, but if you can co-operate with others around you in relation to some of the common tasks, it will make your life much easier! Read more

If your therapy practice were a car, who’s driving?

If your therapy practice is a vehicle, are you an owner, a driver or a passenger?

Think about a car for a moment. You can enjoy the advantages of a car in different ways. You can own the car, drive someone else’s car, or be a passenger in someone else’s car. Read more

Moving to the “Just Enough” Stage in your Practice

When I left my job in the accountancy profession to finish my training as a therapist, I was surprised by how difficult I found the transition to being self-employed. I had been self-employed before, so I thought it would be easy to do it again, this time as a therapist. What took me most by surprise was the challenge of feeling isolated. I was lucky to have a close alliance with a colleague with whom I shared a lot of the set up tasks, and this made it immeasurably easier. Nonetheless, there was a deep sense of being on my own, and a shame that with my background and experience, it should be much easier. Read more

Does the Word Networking Fill you with Terror?

Go on, how do you really feel about networking?

For me, I can’t imagine anything worse than a room full of people I don’t know. I even find it canapes hard to be part of a room full of people I do know, let alone strike up a conversation with strangers. Does this sound familiar?

So, do I have to change into an extrovert overnight in order to market my practice?

Of course not. Neither does networking mean you have to strike up a sales conversation with those you meet. It is simply making contacts, and keeping in contact. You get to choose who you want to talk to, and what you want to say. Read more

Marketing Your Practice on a Shoestring?

Starting out and in the early years, most people don’t have either the financial resources or the confidence to commit a large amount of money to marketing their practice. Some investment is needed, because even though you might feel the whole world is looking at what you do, in practice, there’s so much information out there, and so many services vying for attention, that you have to shout quite hard to be heard over the noise.Photo no (48)

So you want to start promoting your services, but you have very little money. So what do you do? Read more