Tag: Looking after your therapy practice

Stuck on a roundabout in your practice and can’t get off?

I grew up in quite a rigid environment. Both at home and at school, we had many rules that provided structure and order. Beneficial in their way, they also unconsciously provided me with a picture of HOW THINGS ARE and HOW THINGS SHOULD BE. Unfortunately, other people grew up with a different set of parameters, which means that other peoples’ vision of HOW THINGS ARE and HOW THINGS SHOULD BE is not the same as mine. Much of life and relationship is therefore a process of navigating the differences between how I think things should be, and how others think. I’m sure you can relate to this. It’s there in the news and media all the time, one country or political party or commentator sees one thing, while another has a completely different perspective. And that’s healthy.Roundabout Signage

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Minding Your Business of Therapy

Over the last week, I’ve been making suggestions about how you might use the Therapy Practice Business Assessment as the basis for making some changes to your therapy or counselling practice in 2016. So far, we’ve looked at three areas: Knowing Your Practice, Growing Your Practice and Valuing Your Practice. (You can read the blog posts in which I made suggestions in those areas by clicking on the links.)

Today we’re going to look at the fourth pillar of a successful practice, Minding Your Practice.

When they hear that phrase, most people think first about the practical steps of insurance and safety, and these are Therapy_1indeed important. Another important area in minding your practice is self-care, and one that is often overlooked is provision for the future. What steps could you take in 2016 to mind your therapy practice, to make it more robust, and to help create a buffer against the vagaries of life? Here are some ideas…

Hang on, you haven’t read the ideas yet!

Ways to Connect with a Niche Market

binocularsThe other day, I wrote about having a niche market, in order to help clients to find you. (If you’re still struggling with finding a niche, have a look at the list here, and see what you’re attracted to. Pick five areas, and then rank them. You don’t have to commit for life to this subject, think of it for now!)

So you’ve decided on your niche, what now?

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